New York City

Inktober 2018: Wild Things in New York City

For this year’s Inktober, I drew a series of wild things in New York City, from fish in Chinatown markets to lavender on Governor’s Island to parakeets that reside in Southern Brooklyn. What I really liked about this year’s challenge was that I told myself I could only use one box of Blick Brush markers and a single black pen. Restricting color made me more resourceful in needing to use texture, layered colors, and black pen brush strokes with fast drawing techniques to give the impression of what I wanted. I also enjoyed forcing myself to draw something with color every day. I don’t feel the same about each drawing, some were made quit fast or at coffee shops even while on vacation, but a few I really love now. I see them each as a beginning of a larger idea just maybe.

I’m now gearing up to work on a portfolio for 10 to 12 images for the SCBWI New York Conference in February. I’m pretty nervous! But I found a lot of inspiration from this Inktober challenge for that. I’m thinking I might want to do a lot of New York City wildlife scenes for my portfolio, maybe turtles in Central Park or raccoons sneaking into trash cans.

Goodnight Glaser's Bakery

 

When I worked on the Upper East Side I used to take walks over to Glaser's to get a donut or a black and white cookie. The 116 year old bakeshop is a wondrous blast from the past with that teal green sign, the intricate inside, and of course, those iconic New York City cookies. They were even featured in a Mad Men episode.

When I heard they were closing a few months ago, I made a strategic decision to go early to get my last black and white. I'm glad I had my little goodbye back in April. I carried a box home with two cookies on the crosstown bus like a funeral rite.

The sunsetting of Glaser's makes me think of the book I'm currently reading, St. Mark's Is Dead by Ada Calhoun, a great rumination on the constant change of New York City seen through one of the city's most iconic streets.  Calhoun strikes a nice balance of nostalgia for the wonders of the past city and thinking forward on the nature of urban change. She shows us how the city has always lamented "those newcomers" ruining everything, with residents wishing for the mythical past.

I'm stuck then somewhere between loving the ever changing, ever contentious, beat of New York City and feeling pretty downtrodden that the commercial rent is so high that all we get are banks and big brand pharmacies. I understand why a family would want to end their 116 year old store because generations change and grow, that's kinda the American story too, but perhaps it would be less sad if we knew the diversity of stores in New York could keep going.

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Glaser's Bakery 1670 1st Avenue New York, NY 10128